Cornell Chronicle: Major crop gene breakthrough

The discovery of the gene that defines C4 plant metabolism is a huge breakthrough. If successfully transferred to C3 plants like wheat and rice, the potential exists to increase yields by 50% using the same amount of water and fertiliser.

With projections of 9.5 billion people by 2050, humankind faces the challenge of feeding modern diets to additional mouths while using the same amounts of water, fertilizer and arable land as today.

Cornell researchers have taken a leap toward meeting those needs by discovering a gene that could lead to new varieties of staple crops with 50 percent higher yields.

The gene, called Scarecrow, is the first discovered to control a special leaf structure, known as Kranz anatomy, which leads to more efficient photosynthesis. Plants photosynthesize using one of two methods: C3, a less efficient, ancient method found in most plants, including wheat and rice; and C4, a more efficient adaptation employed by grasses, maize, sorghum and sugarcane that is better suited to drought, intense sunlight, heat and low nitrogen.

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via Cornell Chronicle: Major crop gene breakthrough.

 

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